Destinations

Blackpool

Blackpool, UK
Photo by: digypho / Flickr

Blackpool

Famous for the Blackpool Illuminations and the Blackpool Tower, there’s a lot more to the place that attracts visitors.

Places to see:

Blackpool’s answer to the Eiffel Tower, the view from the top of the Blackpool Tower is worth the climb. You go up seven levels of attractions including a circus, bug zone, aquarium and other distractions to delay your ascent.  Blackpool also has three piers and there are seven miles of beaches to explore.

The Blackpool Illuminations are on show for around five weeks through September and October and extend six miles along the Promenade, consisting of over a million light bulbs. Like a carnival, characters and themes are displayed with lasers and searchlights.

Things to do:

Blackpool is less of a place for sightseeing, but there’s a lot to do. For shows, the Winter Gardens is a popular venue. The hundred year old Grand Theatre comes highly recommended for its range of performances from community theatre, opera and national variety shows. Blackpool’s Dance Festival is a world famous annual ballroom dance competition held at the Tower Ballroom, the global centre for ballroom dancing.

One of Blackpool’s main attractions is the Pleasure Beach, maybe Britain’s largest funfair. If you don’t fancy a ride on the eleven roller-coasters, there’s a children’s rides area, side stalls and the park has some excellent Art Deco buildings. Those with a gambling streak might want to try their luck at one of the casinos along the Golden Mile, or see if you can win the jackpot in one of the arcades. For something a little calmer, you can take a donkey ride on the beach.

Getting around:

Blackpool has its own small international airport and offers domestic flights include cheap budget flights to other destinations in the UK. It’s well-connected by road and rail and is easy to get around by public transport.

Shopping:

Blackpool has a couple of shopping areas: one in the town centre with the Hounds Hill shopping centre; and the other in the South Shore Waterloo Road-Bond Street area. This area consists more of clothing shops, souvenir shops and even has an all the year round Christmas shop. The outdoors Bonney Street Market is full of little stalls selling a wide variety of items to buy.

Catch a tram to reach Cleveleys Market where you can find lots of traditional shops, from bakers to cafes selling traditional seaside food and lots of little shops that will keep browsing for hours.

Freeport Shopping Outlet Village is out of town a bit and is a US discount outlet style shopping park has  Marks & Spencer and Next stores in addition to other popular retailers.

Eating out:

There’s a wide range of choice from the best in fish and chips like at Harry Ramsdens on the main Promenade. A more rustic setting like La Fontana offers with its lively Italian courtyard, offering good traditional Italian dishes or for great value, try the Blues Bar & Brasserie at the Big Blue Hotel. This is a popular family restaurant that’s won awards and comes recommended highly for its food and service.  Particularly good value are the fixed price menus and Sunday carvery. Rooms are available here too at affordable rates.

Where to stay:

Blackpool is said to have more hotel and B&B beds than the whole of Portugal. Self-catering and hostel accommodation is available for the budget conscious, but there are hundreds of cheap and mid-range guesthouses, B&Bs and hotels. Try the Sandpiper Bed & Breakfast Hotel that offers great value and clean rooms close to the seafront, just a couple of hundred yards from the Promenade.

For something more upmarket, as well as the Big Blue Hotel with its suites, family rooms and ‘superior’ room, the four-star Barcelo Imperial Hotel is Blackpool’s most historic and is an impressive seafront hotel close to the Tower.